Flintstones and Jack-O-Lanterns in Griffith, Indiana

“Time is measured by the movement of hands, but history is measured by the fruit of their labors.”

Daniel J. Mitchell

Checking out one of Griffith’s most beloved seasonal tourist attractions, today I got to stop by the pumpkin buried lawn of the Berenie family (917 Miller Street, Griffith).

Every year the Berenie’s grow and harvest their own pumpkins on a large plot of land at the corner of Arbogast and Miller Street. Annually carving out a new theme into their monolithic, orange vegetables, this year’s family friendly motif was none other than the Flintstones.

Fortunate enough to catch the carvers in their “pre-carving phase”, I got to watch as they graphed and plotted the endearing sprites onto the bulbous faces of the pumpkins. Wilma Flintstone stood in a perky salute with her hands on her hips, Fred Flintstone cruised in his stone-age automobile with a delightful grin, and the rambunctious Hoppy the Hopparoo (an apparent hybrid of dinosaur/kangaroo) flashed an adorable, dopey smile.

Daring to snag one of the carvers for an interview, I was able to speak with Ms. Berenie at the front of the lawn who welcomed the break. Frustrated in her attempts to draw the Flintstones’ iconic, stone-carved letters, she assured me that as long as there was paint thinner to go around, she’d eventually get it right.

Curious as to how they decide what theme to run with every year, she informed me that it all depends on the pumpkins. Before they even give way to fleeting inspiration, the family pays close attention to both the quantity and quality of the pumpkins to determine which theme will work.

 

 

Baffled at just how much effort goes into the mere grid sketches, I had to ask how much more difficult is it to do the actual carving. Admitting that carving is definitely the most tedious part, they tackle the challenge by carefully utilizing tiny knives to sculpt every minute detail, and occasionally wires where mistakes are made (though, she assured me, this rarely happens).

While they aren’t quite done with the finishing touches yet, Ms. Berenie assured me that most of the pumpkins will be ready for display this coming Sunday. So, if you happen to be in town, indulge in a moment of regression and catch a glimpse of these wonderfully nostalgic Jack-o-lanterns!

Jeepers Creepers

 

The weekend weather made it quite clear that it’s almost time to place the bike back on the rack. Although, I was able to squeeze in a few casual rides down to Oak Ridge Prairie and the Calumet River, even these routine rides were becoming a chore with the high winds and cold air creeping in.

Needless to say, I think these next few days, hopefully weeks, will be marking the end of my bicycling adventures. While I’ll still be able to post about local sights to see and eateries to try, I will most likely be documenting them from the safe heated cockpit of my car rather than the cold leather seat of my bike.

So, what’s next on the agenda? Not wanting to let my favorite season get by without a second glance, I’m planning on doing a little holiday ride around The Region. As the residents dress their lawns with tombstones, drape their walls with ghosts and stock their homes with candy, I will set out into the night to explore some of the creepiest and cutest Halloween decor this side of Northwest Indiana has to offer!

Autumn has Fallen

With Mother Nature fighting me at every turn, it’s becoming increasingly obvious that biking season is coming to a close. Barely able to get out and enjoy the outdoors without dawning a suit of fleece armor, the chill of late fall is all too real.

If you’re able to get out during one of the nicer days over the weekend, I highly recommend paying Oak Ridge Prairie a visit. With autumn officially settling in, the trees are just beginning to transform into gorgeous, organic jewels of orange, yellow and red. There’s a nice playground set-up if you’re planning on bringing the family and plenty of nature trails if you’re merely looking for an escape. While I’m not exactly the hiking expert, one of my fellow bloggers, Earth Traveler, stopped by the park recently for a little expedition. You can check out his misadventures at, Earth Traveler’s Guide to Environmental Entertainment.

Hopefully over the weekend I’ll be able to soak in the last of the waning sunshine and make it out to a few more eateries around Northwest Indiana. I’m thinking in this weather I better start shooting for a place that serves hot chocolate.

Any suggestions…?

The Bread Basket – Hammond, Indiana: Thin Swedish

This weekend my father and I made it to Hammond despite the Little Calumet River Trail being under construction. Taking a subtle, perhaps unwarranted, detour through the smaller portion of the closed trail, we were able to hop onto the Erie-Lackawanna Trail running behind Cabela’s.

 

Riding up to Indianapolis Boulevard, we took a left and arrived at a cozy Hammond favorite, The Bread Basket.

This family owned restaurant run by husband and wife, Ron and Karen, has been serving Northwest Indiana their famed, freshly baked bread since 1985. Not a very large restaurant, their dining area can only sit a handful of people, however, I did notice that they get a lot of carryout orders. The cashier, Diamond, told me that their busiest hours run from 11:30a – 2p, and that they don’t start selling loaves of bread until 2p – 2:30p (which is still depending on how busy they are). Some of their more popular meals include, the Almond Chicken, the Sub Sandwich, and Reuben.

A creature of habit, I ended up ordering my usual, a Thin Swedish with a cup of Cheesy Broccoli Soup, while my dad tried the new Spring Garden Chicken. Turkey, ham, swiss cheese and Romaine lettuce tucked between two slices of freshly baked wheat bread, the Thin Swedish had been a life long addiction since my grandmother introduced me to it when I was naught but a pre-schooler. The Cheesy Broccoli Soup, on the other hand, was a more recent discovery of mine. An exceptional blend of hearty broccoli, creamy cheese and carrots, this concoction was a little more “gardeny” than my lactose tolerant palate desired, but was a quality soup nonetheless. The Spring Garden Chicken was packed with tomato, alfalfa sprouts, avocado and tender grilled chicken on top of wheat bread. While my father said he enjoyed the sandwich, the avocado slices were a tad bit thick for his taste.

They’re open Tuesday thru Friday from 10a to 4p. Though it may not be the easiest place to get to by bike, even with the trail fixed, The Bread Basket is an excellent Northwest Indiana treasure that everyone should try.

Boz Hotdogs – Griffith, Indiana: Cheese Dog

“If time is money we are only getting poorer.”

Daniel J. Mitchell

Still in denial over the brisk fall weather, I thought it would be a good idea to venture out in my customary attire: shorts and a t-shirt. Feeling the cold sting of regret with every pedal, I pressed on in some sick attempt to hold onto summer. While I didn’t allow Mother Nature to win, I eventually had to call for a truce and settled for a close to home eatery in downtown Griffith.

Just off Broad Street and not too far from the Erie-Lackawanna Trail, Boz Hotdogs (formerly known as Bozo Hotdogs) has been a hometown favorite of Griffith ever since I can remember. A short walk away from Central Park and across the street from the Griffith YMCA, Boz Hotdogs is quite literally in the heart of the community.

Ordering my all-time favorite, the cheese dog, I was served a succulent frank smothered in mild nacho cheese accompanied by crispy, golden fries. This sufficiently filling meal in all its splendor surprisingly cost a mere $3.16, drink included!

After inhaling my entree, I stopped by the counter and had a chat with a girl named, Missy. Filling me in on some great fun facts about the place, she said that before Boz, this building was home to an ice cream shop called Tasty Freeze. It later became a “Bozo Hotdogs” back in the 80s, but was forced to convert its infamous ending “O” into a smiley face when transitioning to the new title, “Boz”. While their more popular dishes include the Italian Beef and the Nachos, Missy said most of their orders come in on Mondays for their famous $1.99 hotdogs!

What’s the Scoop – Crown Point, Indiana: Roadrunner Raspberry

If things can always be worse, then now is always better.

Daniel J. Mitchell

As fall slowly takes hold of the elements, I find myself filled with bittersweet feelings. Though autumn is my favorite season, full of bright colors, cool weather, and amusing festivities, it is still a promissory note that winter is soon to follow.

Getting in what biking I can with the time I have left, today I hit the freshly paved Erie-Lackawanna Trail and made a return ride to the Crown Point Downtown Square.

Relatively comfortable in the mild weather, I decided it couldn’t hurt to stop by a Crown Point favorite, What’s the Scoop, and grab an ice cream cone.

This adorable shop located just off the square in a 100 year old historic building, had always grabbed my attention with its brilliant holiday displays and Candyland-esque decor. Established 9 years ago, Sabrina, the owner, took over this “sweet spot” from a former hardware store and has transformed it into the quaint colorful parlor you’re only used to seeing in Christmas cartoons.

As everything, “fell into place”, as she puts it, What’s the Scoop has become a popular hang-out for many of the locals. It’s a place to sit-down and enjoy a freshly made sandwich and warm bowl of soup, or simply to drop in for a sweet, cold ice cream cone. During special occasions, they’ve even been known to reserve the back room full of retro arcade games for birthdays and other events.

Today, experimenting with a new flavor of ice cream (abstaining from my Cookies N’ Cream/Cookie Dough addiction), the cashier at the desk turned me onto the Roadrunner Raspberry. White chocolate ice cream mixed with raspberries, and raspberry-filled chocolate chips, this waffle cone contained the perfect ratio of fruit and sugar!

So stop on in next time you’re in the square and grab a sandwich, play a game, or simply find out, “what’s the scoop”.

Arnie’s Dog House – Munster, Indiana: Polish Sausage and Cheese Fries

Returning to Wicker Memorial Park, I was excited to explore what culinary marvels awaited me in Hammond. However, as I made my way down the rough and dusty path encompassing the park, I found the exit to the Little Calumet River Trail closed for maintenance.

Frustrated, since this was the only route I bothered to research for today’s ride, I was forced to rely on the intuition of the 1/16th Cherokee heritage in my blood. Unfortunately, it only gave me 1/16th good direction.

 

 

Following the alternative path around Wicker Memorial Park, I ran into an ice cream stand that I had been meaning to try, BrrWick Ice Cream. But, as luck would have it, the shop, like the trail, was closed. With no visible signs displaying their hours, and judging from the bareness inside, it appeared that they might be closed for the season. Although, I’m not entirely sure.

Not giving up after strike two, I ventured out of the park and took a right down the sidewalk along Ridge Road.

Attempting to take a safe back road to Calumet Avenue, I passed yet another six roads closed for construction. Now, not even paying attention in the slightest, I took an impulsive right down an unknown road and continued this pattern of irregular turns until I magically made my way onto Calumet Ave.

Not looking a gift horse in the mouth, I sighed in relief having found a familiar scene, the Frozen Yogurt Express. Though I was tempted to take a second visit to this delightful sweet shop, I knew what I really needed was lunch.

Moseying along the road, my hungry eyes were met with a deliciously nostalgic sight, Arnie’s Dog House. A place where my grandmother had been taking me since I was three years old, I couldn’t deny the inevitable hand of fate that guided me here.

Famished and exhausted, I propped my bike against the restaurant and sluggishly entered, ready to eat!

Since I hadn’t been to this All-American eatery in a very long time, I had to ask the cashier, Amanda, what she recommended. Turning me onto the Polish Sausage, accompanied by an order of my absolute favorite cheese fries, my unwavering trust in strangers’ suggestions was once again reinforced.

A bright red sausage covered in a blanket of onions, mild peppers, mustard, and my Chicago treasonist addition of ketchup, this bad boy was the perfect way to slow down my ride by at least 5 miles per hour. Of course, the golden and crispy fries partnered with a cup of bright yellow cheese made this a delectable greasy garden that almost brought me to tears.

Spending a little more time with the team behind the counter, I basked in their grub-gathering wisdom. Asking them to bestow their knowledge of the best and biggest eats on the menu, aside from the Polish Sausage, some of their other popular products include: the Chicago-Style Hotdog, Italian Beef and Pizza Puffs (Pizza Roll-like snacks).

 

Serving Northwest Indiana for 26 years, this family owned restaurant has been feeding the community comfort food since 1986. Although, I’ve been coming to this Arnie’s since I was a toddler, they tell me there is a second location in Whiting.

Though I journeyed here by a rather unorthodox route, they are just up the road from the Little Calumet River Trail, which will optimistically be the way you get to take when stopping by. However, if you find yourself with an insatiable hankering for a mouthwatering Polish Sausage, you can always take the more direct, but bumpy, Ridge Road sidewalk to Calumet Ave.